About your Search

20121002
20121010
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
're not going to have that doctors or medical personnel to support that. i think we need a health-care revision. there's no question about that. but we need a health care revisions that's going to allow a marketplace to compete to bring down the cost. we need to be able to buy insurance across state lines. that means states have to get out of mandates for insurance. we need tort reforms to bring down the cost and we need accessibility for insurance. we need affordability for insurance. this current law is not going to do that. it will continue to drive up health-care costs and the cost of insurance premiums. >> you have 90 seconds. >> let me tell you why -- why i have dedicated my life to the idea that everyone should have access to decent health care. there's a woman in connecticut who has worked hard all her life and so has her husband. her husband was switching jobs and in between those two jobs, during the week he was unemployed, their son was diagnosed with cancer. when it would to get insurance on her husband's new plan, they would not provide for because he had a pre-existing condition.
panels and between the patient and doctor. that is something i do not agree with in our health-care law. that's one of the reasons i oppose it. these are times we have to look at what is best for everyone to have the best kind of health care they can have. i believe in preventive health care and let me just address one thing before -- let me digress for a second. i have never said i'm for privatizing social security or our medicare plans. that's clearly not my thing. congressman murphy knows that has to be honest about that. i will support continuing reform to social security and medicare simply prolong it for our generation. congressman murphy voted to take $716 billion of medicare to fund the affordable health care act. i don't think that is what we should do. we're there for than going to eventually did i those services to our seniors or hospitals or doctors who are going to take medicare patients. . it is being taken out of the pockets of drug industries and drug companies who are making billions of care for seniors. if you are going to be serious about reducing the rate of growth o
to spend huge sums of money for change around the organization of our health-care system -- i'm not sure of that one did or not but generally speaking, the more important legislation moves fast. that is because a deal has been struck and if we have to wait two or three days, the deal can be broken up by all the interests. that is congress saying we've got the decision and you don't have them, public, one of the reasons i like transparency as ideologic, it represents the shift of power back from congress out to the people who congress is elected by. >> as we get ready to go to questions, let me make one or two very quick points -- in terms of successes on our team, there has been a cultural shift in the house. people in both parties in different places within the institution are having the conversation that they really did not have before. you can tell by my panelists from the senate rules committee about how difficult it is to have this kind of conversation in the other chamber. at least at the house, there seems to be a number of members who are serious about these issues in that their
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)